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  1. #1
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    Default The S4 contemporary music thread.

    In 1966 the most popular radio programme was Alan Freeman's Pick of the Pops, with the BBC's dire scheduling of pop records, apart from the pirate radio stations like Radio Caroline, this was the only show that played popular, youth orientated sounds.
    So, with the UK swinging, and the sounds groovy, we take a look at what was popular amongst teenagers in 1966 and '67.

    Top 30 10th September 1966.

    30 Chris Farlowe Out Of Time
    29 Frank Sinatra Strangers in the Night
    28 Zoot Money and the Big Roll Band Big Time Operator
    27 Jnr. Walker and the Allstars How Sweet It Is
    26 Bob Dylan I Want You
    25 Temptations Ain't Too Proud To Beg
    24 Robert Parker Barefootin'
    23 Spencer Davis Group When I Come Home
    22 Mindbenders Ashes To Ashes
    21 Four Tops Loving You Is Sweeter Than Ever
    20 The Who I'm A Boy
    19 Los Bravos Black is Black
    18 Chris Montez The More I See You
    17 Lovin' Spoonful Summer in The City
    16 Ken Dodd More Than Love
    15 Cliff Bennet and the Rebel Rousers Got To get You Into My Life
    14 Alan Price Set Hi-Lilli-Hi-Lo
    13 Mamas and the Papas I Saw Her Again
    12 Cliff Richard Visions
    11 Manfredd Mann Just Like A Woman
    10 Lee Dorsey Working In The Coalmine
    9 The Troggs With A Girl Like You
    8 Dave Berry Mama
    7 David and Jonathan Lovers Of The World Unite
    6 Jim Reeves Distant Drums
    5 Roy Orbison Too Soon To Know
    4 Napoleon XIV They're Coming To take Me Away Ha-Haa
    3 Beach Boys God Only Knows
    2 Smal Faces All Or Nothing
    1 The Beatles Yellow Submarine/Eleanor Rigby

    David and Jonathan was the name used by the British pop music duo Roger Greenaway and Roger Cook.

    They began working together in 1965 in Bristol, England, and wrote the songs "This Golden Ring" and "You've Got Your Troubles" for the group The Fortunes. They teamed with George Martin to do a cover of The Beatles' "Michelle", which was a hit single in 1966 in both the UK (#11 UK Singles Chart) and the U.S. Their UK hit "Lovers of the World Unite" reached number 7
    As David and Jonathan, they also sang the theme song, "Modesty Blaise", composed by Johnny Dankworth, for the spy spoof film Modesty Blaise, starring Monica Vitti, Terence Stamp and Dirk Bogarde.

    The two continued to write songs both alone and together, which were used by artists such as Blue Mink, The Hollies, Engelbert Humperdinck and Whistling Jack Smith amongst others.

    "They're Coming to Take Me Away, Ha-Haaa!" is a novelty record by Jerry Samuels, recorded under the name Napoleon XIV. Released on Warner Bros. Records, the song became an instant success in the United States, peaking at #3 on the Billboard Hot 100 popular music singles chart on 13 August and reaching #4 on the UK Singles Chart.

    In the song, the story is told in the first-person by an insane dog owner who is raving he will be taken away to a mental institution, referring to it as the "funny farm" and "happy home". His dog has run away and he is having an imaginary discussion with it ("Well you just wait, they'll find you yet, and when they do they'll put you in the ASPCA, you mangy mutt"). The cover art shows a spoof "Napoleon" holding an invisible dog on a leash, the collar being next to a fire hydrant (presumably so the dog can relieve itself).



    "Yellow Submarine", written by Paul McCartney (credited to Lennon–McCartney), with lead vocals by Ringo Starr,was included on the Revolver album and issued as a single, coupled with "Eleanor Rigby". The single went to number 1 on every major British chart, remained at number 1 for four weeks and charted for 13 weeks. It won an Ivor Novello Award "for the highest certified sales of any single issued in the UK in 1966".

    It became the title song of the 1968 animated United Artists film, also called Yellow Submarine, and the soundtrack album to the film, released as part of The Beatles' music catalogue, and has since evolved into a popular modern-day nursery rhyme for children.

  2. #2
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    In terms of pirate radio ships (and forts!) it's interesting how Radio Caroline seems to be the most remembered. Whereas Radio London (Big L) had more listeners, slicker presentation and groovier jingles :-) Indeed, when Radio 1 first started they basically copied Big L's music format, DJs and jingles!

    The easy-listening pirate radio station 390 was a particular favourite with Postmaster General Edward Short, who was responsible for outlawing the pirates in the first place!

    The Marine Offences Act (1967) was the legislation that finally sunk the pirates - brought in by a Labour government. Boo!!!

    It's been ages since I've committed an offence with a marine .......

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    Oddly enough I was going to base my first post on the history of radio Caroline and its pirate contemporaries. When it started to get too long and rambling I gave up, but the history of its rise and fall can be easily Googled for anyone who's interested. Believe me, it's fascinating and extremely interesting.
    The Marine Offences Act of 1967 did indeed finally sink the pirates, when it became law on August 14th 1967 many of the pirates had already given up and were too afraid to broadcast, this paved the way for the BBC to take over the airwaves with a major revamp of its radio stations. Radio's 1,2 (previously The Light service),3, and 4 began broadcasting on 30th September 1967.

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    That's a brilliant top 3- all great songs and much played here. I love The Small Faces- they're probably my favourite 60s band other than The Beatles.

    I really like The Lovin' Spoonful's Summer in the City too- nice piece of rock that!

    I've just got my handcuffs and my truncheon and that's enough.

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    As the first new Doctor was having his own personal fireworks display, let's take a look at the top twenty for the w/e 5th November 1966.

    20 Supremes You Can't Hurry Love
    19 Rolling Stones HAve You Seen Your Mother Baby Standing In The Shadow
    18 Elvis Presley All That I Am
    17 Dusty Springfield All I See Is You
    16 The Who I'm A Boy
    15 The Beach Boys Good Vibrations
    14 Cilla Black A Fool I Am
    13 Bobby Darin If I Were A Carpenter
    12 Four Seasons I've Got You Under My Skin
    11 Manfred Man Semi-Detached Suburban Mr. James
    10 Cliff Richard Time Drags By
    9 Dave, Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick and Titch Bend It
    8 The Sandpipers Guantanamera
    7 Herman's Hermits No Milk Today
    6 Paul Jones High Time
    5 New Vaudeville Band Winchester Cathedral
    4 Jim Reeves Distant Drums
    3 The Troggs I Can't Control Myself
    2 The Hollies Stop Stop Stop
    1 The Four Tops Reach Out I'll Be There

    An excellent chart there I reckon, full of sixties classics, memorable songs and iconic figures.
    The huge American summer hit from the Beach Boys is there at 17 as a new entry, that will make #1 in two weeks time.
    It's great to see a Motown track at the top of the charts, Reach Out is classic Motown, full of pumping bass and the label's trademark sound. Reach Out became Motown's biggest selling UK single during this period and the sound had a far reaching influence. Interestingly the single that stands at #13 in this particular chart was covered by The Tops later in 1966 but not issued as a single until 1968 when it went into the top ten for them. Darin's version here is also a cover as the song was originally recorded by folk singer Tim Hardin.

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    Not many Dr. Who episodes went out on the actual day of my birthday, 17th December, The Highlanders episode one was the first, and do you know what, I don't remember a thing about my 11th birthday, but I could relate virtually the whole day of my 10th birthday just the year before. However, the music is something else, I have always claimed that the sixties, especially the music scene was a little vague, but these hits from the w/e 17th December 1966 are quite memorable.

    20 Paul Jones High Time
    19 Roy Orbison There Won't Be Many Coming Home
    18 Four Tops Reach Out I'll Be There
    17 Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick and Tich Save Me
    16 Elvis Presley If Everyday Was Like Christmas
    15 Lee Dorsey Holy Cow
    14 Jim Reeves Distant Drums
    13 Donovan Sunshine Superman
    12 Manfred Mann Semi-Detached Suburban Mr. James
    11 Gene Pitney Just One Smile
    10 Jimmy Ruffin What Becomes Of The Brokenhearted?
    9 Supremes You Keep Me Hangin' On
    8 Spencer Davis Group Gimme Some Lovin'
    7 The Kinks Dead End Street
    6 The Easybeats Friday On My Mind
    5 The Beach Boys Good Vibrations
    4 Small Faces My Mind's Eye
    3 The Seekers Morningtown Ride
    2 Val Doonican What Would I Be
    1 Tom Jones The Green Green Grass Of Home

    There's an excellent cross section there with three Motown classics from the Four Tops, The Supremes and Jimmy Ruffin, two great tracks from The Kinks and The Easybeats, the latter hit covered by David Bowie on his Pinups album in 1973, but it's quite unusual to see a sixties chart without The Beatles in it, they're away honing their sound for the forthcoming "Summer of love".
    The top three are really good sounds too, The Seekers with the memorable Morningtown Ride shows lead vocalist Judith Durham on top form while Val Doonican, who was ever present on TV in the sixties and seventies, gives us one of his big hits. Irishman Doonican was a gentle balladeer who's chart career began in 1964 and due to the popularity of his many variety shows on TV sold albums and singles by the shed load, with hits like Walk Tall, The Special Years, Elusive Butterfly, If The Whole World Stopped Loving and of course, What Would I Be, providing him with massive chart success.
    The voice of local boy Tom Jones reigns supreme at the top of the charts for the third week of a seven week run, it's the Christmas number one folks, go get it.
    Last edited by Stephen Morgan; 13th Apr 2012 at 7:28 AM.

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    That's a pretty fine top 20 - unusually for me, I've at least heard of most of the tracks! Good Vibrations is a huge classic though, probably one of the best pop songs of all time in my opinion. Plus I've just been listening to The Kinks and Small Faces!
    Pity. I have no understanding of the word. It is not registered in my vocabulary bank. EXTERMINATE!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob McCow View Post
    Good Vibrations is a huge classic though, probably one of the best pop songs of all time in my opinion.
    Took 6 months to record too!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob McCow View Post
    Good Vibrations is a huge classic... probably one of the best pop songs of all time in my opinion.
    Yes, I see The surviving members of The Beach Boys have just got back together for a reunion tour.

    Time for another update, this time the charts for w/e 11th February 1967.

    20 Georgie Fame Sitting In The Park
    19 Sandy Posey The Single Girl
    18 Wayne Fontana Pamela Pamela
    17 New Vaudeville Band Peek-A-Boo
    16 Cream I Feel Free
    15 Jim Reeves I Won't Come In While He's There
    14 The Royal Guardsmen Snoopy Versus The Red Baron
    13 Four Tops Standing In The Shadows Of Love
    12 Engelbert Humperdinck Release Me
    11 Ken Dodd Let Me Cry On Your Shoulder
    10 Nancy Sinatra Sugar Town
    9 Spencer Davis Group I'm A Man
    8 Petula Clark This IS My Song
    7 Tom Jones The Green Green Grass Of Home
    6 Jimi Hendrix Hey Joe
    5 Paul Jones I've Been A Bad Bad Boy
    4 The Move Night Of Fear
    3 Rolling Stones Let's Spend The Night Together
    2 Cat Stevens Matthew And Son
    1 The Monkees I'm A Believer

    There's a new entry at #40 from crooner Vince Hill with Edelweiss, I think it's the first instance of a hit cover of a song from The Sound of Music. The film's soundtrack album had already spent the best part of two years on the album chart, haven't got full stats of that one to hand right now, but according to NME album charts it went to number one no less than seven times in that period, vying for popularity with The Beatles Rubber Soul and Revolver, Rolling Stones Aftermath, The Small Faces eponymous album, Beach Boys Pet Sounds and The Monkees.
    Hill's single would eventually climb to number two, kept off the top by Engelbert's Release Me.
    The number one by The Monkees is an early entry from the pen of Neil Diamond.

  10. #10
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    Matthew and Son- I LOVE that song!

    I've just got my handcuffs and my truncheon and that's enough.

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    Since we last looked at the charts, February 1967, we've had several different number ones, This Is My Song by Petula Clark spent two weeks at the top, followed by a 6 week run for Engelbert Humperdinck's Release Me and then a two week run for Nancy Sinatra with her father daughter duet Something Stupid. The song was written by Carson Parkes as a duet for him and his wife Gaile Foote. Frank Sinatra latched onto the song and took it to Nancy's producer Lee Hazelwood, the result becam a worldwide smash.
    The song was covered in 2001 by Robbie Williams and Nicole Kidman who also took it to number one.

    Let's take a look at the top twenty for w/e 13th May 1967, the day of broadcast of the final episoe of The Faceless Ones.

    20 Eddie Floyd Knock On Wood
    19 Beach Boys Then I Kissed Her
    18 Four Tops Bernadette
    17 Bee Gees New York Mining Disaster 1941
    16 Turtles Happy Together
    15 Engelbert Humperdinck Release Me
    14 Jeff Beck Hi Ho Silver Lining
    13 Cat Stevens I'm Gonna Get Me A Gun
    12 Manfred Mann Ha Ha Said The Clown
    11 Dubliners Seven Drunken Nights
    10 The Monkees A Little Bit Me A Little Bit You
    9 The Move I Can Hear The Grass Grow
    8 Tom Jones Funny Familiar Forgotten Feelings
    7 Jimi Hendrix Experience Purple Haze
    6 Lulu The Boat That I Row
    5 The Who Pictures Of Lily
    4 The Tremeloes Silence Is Golden
    3 Mamas and the Papas Dedicated To The One I Love
    2 Nancy Sinatra and Frank Sinatra Something Stupid
    1 Sandie Shaw Puppet On A String

    Sandie Shaw's Puppet On A String is on it's third and final week atop the UK charts. It was her biggest and most popular hit and of course that year's Eurovision Song Contest winner. Shaw has gone on record expressing her dislike of the song, despite this she continued to perform it, and indeed still does, at any given opportunity.

    The Eddie Floyd song at number 20 has become something of a standard which has been recorded and performed many times over the years. Eddie Floyd's contemporary, Otis Redding, reached 35 with the song in 1967, but by far the most popular recordings of the song come from David Bowie who's live version reached number 10 in late 1974, and a disco version by Amii Stewart reached number 6 in May 1979 while a remix by the same artist went to number 7 in 1985.

    A little lower down in this chart at 33 is Pink Floyd with Arnold Layne, the record is on its sixth week in the charts and has peaked at number 20 back in late April.
    Here's a few facts about the song.

    Original member Syd Barrett wrote this about a cross-dresser named "Arnold Layne" who used to steal bras and panties from clotheslines in Cambridge, England.
    Barrett lived near Roger Waters growing up. Their mothers both lost underwear to Arnold Layne.
    Pink Floyd's first single. It was not used on an album.
    Barrett was the group leader and an excellent songwriter, but he did a lot of drugs and lost his mind over the next year, becoming England's first high-profile acid casualty. He was kicked out of the band the next year, replaced by David Gilmour.
    Radio London banned this because it was about a transvestite.
    Before the band came out at their shows in the late '80s, this played while video of Pink Floyd in 1967 was shown on the giant screens.
    This had a Blues sound the band was known for. Pink Floyd's name originated from Syd Barrett. His two favorite blues artists, Pink Anderson and Floyd Council, appeared to him in what he referred to as a "vision," giving Syd the idea for the name.
    The promotional black and white music video displayed the band with Syd. During the video, the band dressed up a mannequin and took it to a beach.


    Arnold Layne had a strange hobby
    collecting clothes, moonshine washing lines
    they suit him fine

    On the wall hung a tall mirror
    distorted view, see through, baby blue
    he got it

    Oh Arnold Layne, it's not the same
    it takes two to know, two to know, two to know, two to know
    why can't you see
    Arnold Layne, Arnold Layne,
    Arnold Layne

    Now he's caught a nasty sort of person
    they gave him time, doors bang chaingang
    he hated

    Arnold Layne, Arnold Layne
    Arnold Layne
    Arnold Layne
    don't do it again

    In 2006 David Bowie guested on stage with Dave Gilmour and released a live version of the song as a tribute to the then recently deceased Syd Barrett.

  12. #12
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    Shaw has gone on record expressing her dislike of the song, despite this she continued to perform it, and indeed still does, at any given opportunity.
    She's damned right, it's an absolute nightmare of a song. Infects your brain and goes round and round and round... a real horror.

    There's a few all-time classics in that chart, including Jimi's Purple Haze! Arnold Layne might have attracted controversy, but the lyrics are nothing like as subversive as Jimi's blatant hymn about drug use. And there's that famous mis-hearing of the line 'Scuse me, while I kiss the sky' as 'Scuse me, while I kiss this guy!' So it could be heard as an overtly homosexual song too! (Although only if you're very cloth-eared).
    Pity. I have no understanding of the word. It is not registered in my vocabulary bank. EXTERMINATE!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob McCow View Post
    there's that famous mis-hearing of the line 'Scuse me, while I kiss the sky' as 'Scuse me, while I kiss this guy!' So it could be heard as an overtly homosexual song too! (Although only if you're very cloth-eared).
    You wouldn't have to have been all that cloth-eared, given the state of medium wave and how most people listened to a small transistor (tranny) radio back then it's no surprise that there were a good many mis heard lyrics.

  14. #14
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    Let's take a look at the charts for the weeks 20th May to 1st July 1967.

    We begin with The Tremeloes Silence is Golden at number 1, this had recently been a huge American hit for Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons, one of three succesive US number ones for them.
    Next up at number 1 is a sixties classic from Procul Harum, A Whiter Shade of Pale. With its haunting Bach-flavoured instrumental melody, played on Hammond organ, soulful vocals, and unusual lyrics (which allude to drunken seduction and eventually sex) by the song's co-authors Gary Brooker, Keith Reid and Matthew Fisher, "A Whiter Shade of Pale" reached #1 in several countries when released in 1967 and which became e recognised sixties classic. The single spent six weeks at the top of the UK charts to be dethroned by another Beatles classic which we'll come to a little later.

    Here then I present a top 40 for the week ending 1st July 1967.

    40 The Marvelettes When You're Young And In Love
    39 Tom Jones Funny Familiar Forgotten Feelings
    38 Jimi Hendrix Experience The Wind Cries Mary
    37 Sandie Shaw Puppet On A String
    36 Happenings I Got Rhythm
    35 Nancy and Frank Sinatra Something Stupid
    34 Judith Durham Olive Tree
    33 Engelbert Humperdinck Release Me
    32 Dubliners Seven Drunken Nights
    31 Otis Redding Shake
    30 Gladys Knight and the Pips Take Me In Your Arms And Love Me
    29 Dusty Springfield Give Me Time
    28 Pink Floyd See Emily Play
    27 PP Arnold First Cut Is The Deepest
    26 Cliff Richard I'll Come Running
    25 Aretha Franklin Respect
    24 Cilla Black What Good Am I
    23 Mamas and Papas Dedicated To The One I Love
    22 Vince Hill Roses of Picardy
    21 The Troggs Night of the Long Grass
    20 Vicki Carr It Must Be Him
    19 Cream Strange Brew
    18 New Vaudeville Band Finchley Central
    17 The Four Tops Seven Rooms of Gloom
    16 The Beach Boys Then I Kissed Her
    15 Kinks Waterloo Sunset
    14 Small Faces Here Come The Nice
    13 Arthur Conley Sweet Soul Music
    12 Petula Clark Don't Sleep In The Subway
    11 Topol If I Were A Rich Man
    10 Supremes The Happening
    9 The Tremeloes Silence Is Golden
    8 The Young Rascals Groovin'
    7 The Monkees Alternate Title
    6 The Turtles She'd Rather Be With Me
    5 Traffic Paper Sun
    4 Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick and Titch Okay!
    3 The Hollies Carrie Ann
    2 Engelbert Humpedinck There Goes My Everything
    1 Procul Harum A Whiter Shade Of Pale

    Well, after spending six weeks at the top, Procul Harum were eventually dethroned on 21st July by what one can only describe as a sixties anthem, All You Need Is Love by The Beatles, a song which held the number one spot all through the "Summer of love" in 1967.
    The chart I've just posted holds many of the classic tracks that became the soundtrack of the summer of love as the Hippy Generation celebrated peace and love. Tracks from Cream, Traffic, The Turtles, Mamas and Papas, Kinks, New Vaudeville Band, and another which, with All You Need Is Love, would become synonymous with the era, Scott McKenzie's San Francisco (Be Sure To Wear Some Flowers In Your Hair) which would take the number one slot throughout August.
    They were crazy days for those who lived through them, the memories are very vague and surreal for me, a lot of the craziness I only saw on tv in shows like The Monkees which reflected all the "Hipness" of the period. Even top UK shows like Steptoe and Son caught on to it with Harold Steptoe ready to don kaftan and hippy beads at the drop of a hat. Series like The Avengers and The Prisoner became increasingly surrealistic, but above all the music made the decade even more remarkable.

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